Picture Library - The Civil War

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The Civil War

Figure brasses were already going out of fashion before the Civil War accelerated the trend. The war not only disrupted normal trade but also led to the destruction of many brasses that had survived the Reformation. 

Philip Lord Wharton lost his only son Arthur shortly before the war broke out. Lord Wharton was an active supporter of Parliament although his military career was short. William Strode fought for Parliament in the West Country and Major General Ralph Assheton was a successful Parliamentary commander in the North-West. Adam Beaumont was his son-in-law. Captain Hastings Keyt was killed fighting for the King during the battle of Stow in 1647 and was buried in the local church. In contrast, Sir Owen Wynn tried to live as normal a life as possible despite the impact of the fighting in North Wales. Philip Edelen was a preacher who benefited from Parliament's victory but felt troubled by the times he had lived through.

Click the links below for the corresponding thumbnail image. Click any image for an enlarged view. 

Arthur Wharton, 1642, Wooburn, Buckinghamshire


Incised slab to Hastings Keyt, 1646, Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire


William Strode, 1649, Shepton Mallet, Somerset


Ralph Assheton, 1650, Middleton, Lancashire


Adam Beaumont, 1655, Kirkheaton, Yorkshire


Philip Edelen, 1657, Denham, Buckinghamshire


Sir Owen Wynne of Gwydir, 1660, Llanryst, Wales






Arthur Wharton, 1642,

Wooburn, Buckinghamshire








Incised slab to Hastings Keyt, 1646,

Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire







William Strode, 1649,

Shepton Mallett, Somerset








Ralph Assheton, 1650,

Middleton, Lancashire








Adam Beaumont, 1655,

Kirkheaton, Yorkshire









Philip Edelen, 1657,

Denham, Buckinghamshire








Sir Owen Wynne of Gwydir, 1660,

Llanryst, Wales


 
















Copyright © 2002 Monumental Brass Society (MBS)

Page last updated 18 September 2008